Untitled Image (Transporting Sugar Hogsheads by Boat)

Description

From the Caribbean island of St. Vincent, the picture shows a small boat with a six-man crew, loading a large hogshead of sugar. Dating from the post-emancipation period, but evoking similar scenes of the later slave period (and well into the twentieth century). Author viewed this scene in early 1847, on a visit to a small village in St. Vincent which had a small wooden pier used for shipping sugar. Day wrote how "the drogher, a schooner generally about forty-five tons. . . conveys the sugar from the estates to the ship in which it is exported, lies at anchor a few hundred yards from the shore. . . The boats called moses-boats, which convey the hogshead from the shore to the drogher, are tremendously strong. . . They are manned by Negroes and Carib Indians, and the very launching of such a heavy boat through such a surf is a sight to be remembered" (pp. 94-95).

Source

Charles William Day, Five year's residence in the West Indies (London, 1852), vol. 1, p. 95.

Language

English

Rights

Image is in the public domain. Metadata is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International.

Identifier

Day1

Spatial Coverage

Caribbean--St. Vincent

Citation

"Untitled Image (Transporting Sugar Hogsheads by Boat)", Slavery Images: A Visual Record of the African Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Early African Diaspora, accessed October 25, 2021, http://slaveryimages.org/s/slaveryimages/item/822
From the Caribbean island of St. Vincent, the picture shows a small boat with a six-man crew, loading a large hogshead of sugar. Dating from the post-emancipation period, but evoking similar scenes of the later slave period (and well into the twentieth century). Author viewed this scene in early 1847, on a visit to a small village in St. Vincent which had a small wooden pier used for shipping sugar. Day wrote how "the drogher, a schooner generally about forty-five tons. . . conveys the sugar from the estates to the ship in which it is exported, lies at anchor a few hundred yards from the shore. . . The boats called moses-boats, which convey the hogshead from the shore to the drogher, are tremendously strong. . . They are manned by Negroes and Carib Indians, and the very launching of such a heavy boat through such a surf is a sight to be remembered" (pp. 94-95).
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