Clothing Styles of Peasant Women, Jamaica, 1840s

Description

Captioned, Female Negro Peasant in her Sunday and Working Dress, shows the difference in clothing styles; both figures carry baskets, one under the arm, the other on her head. The author, a Baptist missionary, had resided in Jamaica since 1823. Although this scene is post-emancipation it is evocative of the later slave period (which ended in 1834-38). Seldom, indeed, Phillippo writes, is an individual seen, especially on the Sabbath, except in the most becoming attire. . . . The dress of the women generally consists of a printed or white cotton gown, with a white handkerchief tied in a turban-like manner round their heads, and a neat straw hat trimmed with white riband; while some, especially the young women, wear straw bonnets and white muslin dresses . . . . Contrary to the prevailing opinion in England, the taste of the females is no longer characterized by a love of gaudy colours (pp. 230-31).

Source

James M. Phillippo, Jamaica: its past and present state (London, 1843), p. 230

Language

English

Rights

Image is in the public domain. Metadata is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International.

Identifier

Phillippo02

Spatial Coverage

Caribbean--Jamaica

Citation

"Clothing Styles of Peasant Women, Jamaica, 1840s ", Slavery Images: A Visual Record of the African Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Early African Diaspora, accessed October 25, 2021, http://slaveryimages.org/s/slaveryimages/item/697
Captioned, Female Negro Peasant in her Sunday and Working Dress, shows the difference in clothing styles; both figures carry baskets, one under the arm, the other on her head. The author, a Baptist missionary, had resided in Jamaica since 1823. Although this scene is post-emancipation it is evocative of the later slave period (which ended in 1834-38). Seldom, indeed, Phillippo writes,  is an individual seen, especially on the Sabbath, except in the most becoming attire. . . . The dress of the women generally consists of a printed or white cotton gown, with a white handkerchief tied in a turban-like manner round their heads, and a neat straw hat trimmed with white riband; while some, especially the young women, wear straw bonnets and white muslin dresses . . . . Contrary to the prevailing opinion in England, the taste of the females is no longer characterized by a love of gaudy colours (pp. 230-31).
IIIF Manifest Download