Fruit Seller

Description

This image shows a hawker with her goods piled next to her. Walking through a market, the author, who visited Cuba in 1866, observed "the little tables, or more usually the piles of fruit on the ground, and. . . some of the queer-looking fruits. . . which are totally unheard of by the names which the Negroes give them, many of them. . . being quite palatable; he identified a number of the fruits by name" (p. 89). Samuel Hazard (1834-1876) was an American publisher and bookseller from Pennsylvania, who collected engravings and prints. After joining the union army, he rose through the ranks as brevet major until he resigned on surgeon's certificate of disability in 1865. After, he traveled to Cuba and Santo Domingo as a correspondent of the Philadelphia Press during protracted conflict related to the decolonization of the Spanish Caribbean.

Source

Samuel Hazard, Cuba with pen and pencil (Hartford, Conn., 1871), p. 89.

Language

English

Rights

Image is in the public domain. Metadata is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International.

Identifier

Hazard5

Spatial Coverage

Caribbean--Cuba

Citation

"Fruit Seller", Slavery Images: A Visual Record of the African Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Early African Diaspora, accessed October 15, 2021, http://slaveryimages.org/s/slaveryimages/item/691
This image shows a hawker with her goods piled next to her. Walking through a market, the author, who visited Cuba in 1866, observed "the little tables, or more usually the piles of fruit on the ground, and. . . some of the queer-looking fruits. . . which are totally unheard of by the names which the Negroes give them, many of them. . . being quite palatable; he identified a number of the fruits by name" (p. 89). Samuel Hazard (1834-1876) was an American publisher and bookseller from Pennsylvania, who collected engravings and prints. After joining the union army, he rose through the ranks as brevet major until he resigned on surgeon's certificate of disability in 1865. After, he traveled to Cuba and Santo Domingo as a correspondent of the Philadelphia Press during protracted conflict related to the decolonization of the Spanish Caribbean.
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