Bunce (Bance) Island and Fort, Sierra Leone, 1727

Description

Caption: The North-west Prospect of Bense [sic] Island on the River Sierra-Leone. Also, referred to variously as Bence, Bense, Bance, the island is situated in the Sierra Leone river, near Freetown. It was important to the British slave trade in the mid 18th century. Smith, a surveyor, was hired by the Royal African Company in 1726 to survey its forts in West Africa. The caption provides some details on the factory, its location, and the naming of Sierra Leone; the chief trade of these parts are slaves, ivory, and camwood. See also image mariners18. Another view of the island is shown in an 1805 watercolor held by the National Maritime Museum (Greenwich). For a description of British slave trading activities and the island's importance in the mid-18th century, see Sean M. Kelley, The Voyage of the Slave Ship Hare (The University of North Carolina Press, 2016), passim.

Source

William Smith, Thirty different drafts of Guinea (London, 1727), plate 7.

Creator

Smith, William

Language

English

Rights

Image is in the public domain. Metadata is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International.

Identifier

mariners17

Spatial Coverage

Africa--Rivers--Bunce Island

Citation

"Bunce (Bance) Island and Fort, Sierra Leone, 1727", Slavery Images: A Visual Record of the African Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Early African Diaspora, accessed January 26, 2021, http://slaveryimages.org/s/slaveryimages/item/565
Caption: The North-west Prospect of Bense [sic] Island on the River Sierra-Leone. Also, referred to variously as Bence, Bense, Bance, the island is situated in the Sierra Leone river, near Freetown. It was important to the British slave trade in the mid 18th century. Smith, a surveyor, was hired by the Royal African Company in 1726 to survey its forts in West Africa. The caption provides some details on the factory, its location, and the naming of Sierra Leone; the chief trade of these parts are slaves, ivory, and camwood. See also image mariners18. Another view of the island is shown in an 1805 watercolor held by the National Maritime Museum (Greenwich). For a description of British slave trading activities and the island's importance in the mid-18th century, see Sean M. Kelley, The Voyage of the Slave Ship Hare (The University of North Carolina Press, 2016), passim.
IIIF Manifest Download