Funeral, Angola, 1786-87

Description

Caption, Vue de la montagne de Cabende prise au midi, et Deuil du masouc, Andris Poncouta, macaye (View of the Cabinda mountain taken at noon, and Funeral of the masouc, Andris Poncouta, macaye). The author gives a lengthy description of the funeral of an important personage. The Black Congolese bury their dead, but mourn them a long time before burying them; since the funeral is the day the mourning period comes to an end, it is consecrated to rejoicing. Therefore, the burial of a Congolese man isn't a somber affair, and everyone rejoices . . . . The dead man is placed on a bed of honor, and placed in the middle of a large courtyard, under a tent which contains his finest objects . . . . (pp. 141-44). Author was a French Naval officer who was mainly in the Angola region; engravings in his book were made from drawings done from his own observations in 1786-87.

Source

Louis de Grandpre, Voyage a la cote occidentale d'Afrique, fait dans les annèes 1786 et 1787 (Paris, 1801), vol. 1, facing p. 143. (Copy in Library Company of Philadelphia)

Language

French

Rights

Image is in the public domain. Metadata is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International.

Identifier

LCP-10

Spatial Coverage

Africa--West Central North--Cabinda

Citation

"Funeral, Angola, 1786-87", Slavery Images: A Visual Record of the African Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Early African Diaspora, accessed October 16, 2021, http://slaveryimages.org/s/slaveryimages/item/1658
Caption, Vue de la montagne de Cabende prise au midi, et Deuil du masouc, Andris Poncouta, macaye (View of the Cabinda mountain taken at noon, and Funeral of the masouc, Andris Poncouta, macaye). The author gives a lengthy description of the funeral of an important personage. The Black Congolese bury their dead, but mourn them a long time before burying them; since the funeral is the day the mourning period comes to an end, it is consecrated to rejoicing. Therefore, the burial of a Congolese man isn't a somber affair, and everyone rejoices . . . . The dead man is placed on a bed of honor, and placed in the middle of a large courtyard, under a tent which contains his finest objects . . . .  (pp. 141-44).  Author was a French Naval officer who was mainly in the Angola region; engravings in his book were made from drawings done from his own observations in 1786-87.
IIIF Manifest Download