Planting Sweet Potatoes, Edisto Island, South Carolina, 1862

Description

A critical discussion of this apparently posed photograph on Hopkinson's plantation (taken by Henry P. Moore, 1833-1911) is in W. Jeffrey Bolster and Hilary Anderson, Soldiers, Sailors, Slaves, and Ships: The Civil War Photographs of Henry P. Moore (Concord, New Hampshire: New Hampshire Historical Society), 1999, p. 78; see also, Ellen Dugan, ed., Picturing the South, 1860 to the Present (San Francisco, Chronicle Books, 1996), p. 35. The photo shows the fanner basket, probably of African origin, used for rice and other purposes, in the lower right corner (John Vlach, The Afro-American Tradition in Decorative Arts [Cleveland Museum of Art], 1978), fig. 1). The LOC image is a photographic print on a card mount; the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (New York City) has a copy taken from some publication.

Source

Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, (LC-DIG-ppmsca-11398)

Language

English

Rights

Image is in the public domain. Metadata is available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International.

Identifier

NW0151

Spatial Coverage

North America--South Carolina

Citation

"Planting Sweet Potatoes, Edisto Island, South Carolina, 1862", Slavery Images: A Visual Record of the African Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Early African Diaspora, accessed October 25, 2021, http://slaveryimages.org/s/slaveryimages/item/1105
A critical discussion of this apparently posed photograph on Hopkinson's plantation (taken by Henry P. Moore, 1833-1911) is in W. Jeffrey Bolster and Hilary Anderson, Soldiers, Sailors, Slaves, and Ships: The Civil War Photographs of Henry P. Moore (Concord, New Hampshire: New Hampshire Historical Society), 1999, p. 78; see also, Ellen Dugan, ed., Picturing the South, 1860 to the Present (San Francisco, Chronicle Books, 1996), p. 35. The photo shows the fanner basket, probably of African origin, used for rice and other purposes, in the lower right corner (John Vlach, The Afro-American Tradition in Decorative Arts [Cleveland Museum of Art], 1978), fig. 1). The LOC image is a photographic print on a card mount; the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (New York City) has a copy taken from some publication.
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